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12:30pm - 2:10pm

Networking Luncheon, Last Chance for Exhibit and Poster Viewing

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7:30am - 8:00am 30 mins
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Scientific Breakfast Briefing #1
AbTHENEUM Technology Delivers Antibody Metadata: Native Sequence Pairs Correlated with Binding Activity against Your Targeted Region of Antigen
  • Chun-Nan Chem, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Single Cell Technology, Inc.

The best chance to find a low frequency hit is to capture a broad diversity of the immune response. Single Cell Technology uses affinity-maturated B cells on a platform that collects metadata per cell: binding activity against multiple screening molecules is correlated with native VH and VL sequence pairs. Case studies from antibody campaigns will be presented.

7:30am - 8:00am 30 mins
Info
Scientific Breakfast Briefing #2
Combining High-Throughput Single-Cell Screening with Ig-Seq: Deep Screening and Functional Annotation Of Human Antibody Repertoires
  • Sherie Duncan, PhD - Manager Programs and Partnerships, AbCellera

The application of high-throughput sequencing to antibody repertoires (Ig-Seq) enables comprehensive analysis of natural immune responses. A key challenge to realizing its potential for vaccine development, antibody discovery, and diagnostics is connecting sequence diversity with functional data. We present the combination of Ig-Seq with AbCellera’s microfluidic single-cell screening technology to enable deep profiling and functional annotation of human immune responses to viral pathogens.

8:10am - 8:15am 5 mins
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
Co-Chairs Remarks
  • Jamie Scott, MD, PhD - Professor and Canada Research Chair , Simon Fraser University
  • Eline (Nina) Luning Prak, MD, PhD - Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School
8:10am - 8:15am 5 mins
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Co-Chair's Remarks
  • Paul Parren, PhD - Professor, Leiden University and EVP and Head of R&D, Lava Therapeutics
  • Dennis Burton, PhD - Professor and Chairman, Department of Immunology & Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute
8:15am - 8:45am 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
Defining and Tracking Large B Cell Clones in Humans
  • Eline (Nina) Luning Prak, MD, PhD - Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School

Clonal expansion is a fundamental property of adaptive immunity.  Monitoring immune responses as well as evaluating and monitoring patients for lymphoproliferative disorders all require robust methods for defining clone size and tracking clones across different samples. To perform these studies, we have developed a series of experimental and analytical methods.  Evaluations of B cells will be described that highlight some of these methods revealing how clones can be studied to define tissue-based B cell networks, B-cell subsets and clonal evolution of malignant B cells.    

8:15am - 8:45am 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Imaging Complement by Phase-plate Cryo-electron Tomography from Initiation to Pore Formation
  • Thom Sharp, PhD - Assistant Professor, Leiden University Medical Center

We have used cryo-electron tomography to image the build-up of complement complexes on liposomal membrane surfaces, from activation by antibody complexes to stepwise formation of terminal pathway components. We recently determined the structure of hexameric and pentameric IgM-C1 initiation complexes, where we observed complete density for the C1r2s2 proteases bound to C1q, as well as C1s interacting with C4b, providing novel insights into C4 cleavage and subsequent C4b2a-C3 convertase formation.

8:45am - 9:15am 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
History Will Teach Us Something: Following Patterns of Amino Acid Diversity to Identify Clonal Shift and Drift in Immune Cell Populations
  • Uri Hershberg, PhD - Assistant Professor, Drexel University

B cells are unique in our body for undergoing two stages of diversification and selection. First, in development, unique heavy and light chain pairs are created through V(D)J recombination. Then, during an immune response, the B cell receptor gene is further mutated and B cell mutants from different clones (different progenitor cells with unique V(D)J sequences) compete to bind antigen over several rounds of proliferation and death. We will describe how we can use the differing patterns of somatic and germline amino acid diversity, found in high throughput sequencing experiments of B cell receptor populations, to describe the competition between clones (clonal shift) and between mutant members of the same clone (clonal drift) under different healthy and pathological immune contexts.

8:45am - 9:15am 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Complement Activation Alone Drives Efficacy of a Novel Anti-gonococcal Monoclonal Antibody
  • Sanjay Ram, Ph.D - Professor of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School

The human IgG1 Fc of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against gonococcal lipooligosaccharide was engineered to enhance Fc:Fc interactions and hexamerisation following surface-target binding, thereby increasing complement activation (HexaBody® technology). This modified mAb showed significantly greater bactericidal activity in vitro and efficacy in mice compared with ‘Fc-unmodified’ chimeric 2C7. Efficacy of the mAb in a mouse model of gonococcal colonization required terminal complement pathway activation.

9:15am - 9:45am 30 mins
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
Exploring How Pre-immune B-cell Receptor Repertoires Are Shaped
  • Duane Wesemann, MD, PhD - Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital
9:15am - 9:45am 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Engineered Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Transmission for Elimination of Malaria
  • Robert Sauerwein, MD, PhD - Professor, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Radboud UMC

Malaria transmission in the population starts with mosquitoes’ blood-feeding on humans infected with Plasmodium parasites. In the mosquito midgut, sexual forms egress from the red blood cells and males fertilize female parasites. Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are essential proteins in this process. Transmission blocking antibodies are critical for eradication of malaria. We developed (engineered) monoclonal antibodies with strong potency to block fertilization. The newly generated antibodies provide new leads for the development of passive immunization strategies against Plasmodium transmission.

9:45am - 10:30am 45 mins
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
Networking Refreshment Break in Poster & Exhibit Hall
9:45am - 10:30am 45 mins
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Networking Refreshment Break in Poster & Exhibit Hall
10:30am - 11:00am 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
Antibody Repertoire Responses to Infection and Vaccination
  • Scott Boyd, MD, PhD - Assistant Professor, Stanford University Medical Center

Almost all successful vaccines rely on antibody production and the formation of B cell memory, but the diversity of individual humoral responses has posed challenges in human immunological research. By combining single-cell analysis of antibody specificities and high-throughput sequencing of B cell receptor repertoires, we have identified common features of the antibody responses of human subjects to vaccinations and infections, including convergent antibody species with highly similar sequences.

10:30am - 11:00am 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Antibody Recognition of P. falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein and Implications for Malaria Vaccine Design
  • Ian Wilson, D.Phil - Hansen Professor of Structural Biology, The Scripps Research Institute

RTS,S is a recombinant circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-based vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum that contains 19 NANP repeats. We have determined structures of antibodies from a human RTS,S trial that recognize the NANP repeats and inhibit parasite development in the liver. Such structural insights may aid in design of a next-generation malaria vaccine

11:00am - 11:30am 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
B Cell Repertoire Selection in Early Multiple Sclerosis
  • Nancy Monson, PhD - Associate Professor, UT Southwestern

Patients at high risk to develop Multiple Sclerosis display an expansion of plasmablasts and an antibody gene signature that is distinct. The data supporting these observations will be presented in this talk along with implications for diagnosis and therapy of Multiple Sclerosis.

11:00am - 11:30am 30 mins
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Presentation Ttitle TBA
  • Robert Seder, MD - Chief, Cellular Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH
11:30am - 12:00pm 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Clonal Expansion of Lymphocytes in Immune Repertoires
Anti-tumor Immune Repertoires
  • Daniel Emerling, PhD - Senior Vice President, Research, Atreca, Inc

Adaptive immunity to tumors not only relies on T cells, but also involves immunoglobulins. We sequenced immunoglobulin repertoires from over 100 cancer patients and used sequence and clonal lineage analyses to select specific antibodies for recombinant expression and characterization. Screened antibodies bound non-autologous human tumor tissues at high rates, consistent with recognition of public tumor antigens. Some antibodies caused tumor regression in mouse cancer models. Clonal lineages in immune responses to cancer can be a repository of anti-tumor receptors.

11:30am - 12:00pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Vaccines and Antibodies in Infectious Disease
Rapid Identification of Broad and Potent “Super-antibodies” to Speed Pandemic Responses
  • Laura Walker, Ph.D - Associate Director, Adimab, LLC.

A new generation of broad and highly potent "super-antibodies" offer promise for the prophylaxis and therapy of a wide range of infections. In this talk, I will provide an overview of Adimab's B cell isolation platform and describe how we have used this technology for the isolation of super-antibodies to multiple emerging viral pathogens.

12:00pm - 12:30pm 30 mins
Info
Scientific Briefing 1
Computational Approaches for Optimizing the Developability of Biotherapeutics
  • Nels Thorsteinson - Scientific Services Manager, Biologics, Chemical Computing Group

mAb candidates identified from high-throughput screening or binding affinity optimization often present liabilities for developability, such as aggregation-prone regions or poor solution behavior. In this work, we optimized an integrin α11 binding mAb for developability using homology modeling and rational design where reducing hydrophobic surface patches improved HIC behavior. A retrospective data analysis demonstrates that 3D descriptors and multi-parameter models can screen candidates and enrich libraries with favorable developability properties for a range of biotherapeutics.

12:00pm - 12:30pm 30 mins
Info
Scientific Briefing 2
A Computational Framework for Predicting Protein Liabilities & Improvement of Antibody Developability
  • Johannes Maier, PhD - Principal Scientist, Schrodinger

We are presenting a novel method for predicting aggregation hotspots on proteins/peptides termed "AggScore". This method is entirely structure-based and is agnostic to the presence of natural amino acids or training to amyoloidic aggregation. In addition, we introduce a machine-learning engine to address protein liabilities termed BioQSPR and showcase its versatility and applicability in retrospective and prospective examples

12:00pm - 12:30pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 3
TBA
12:30pm - 2:10pm 100 mins
Networking Luncheon, Last Chance for Exhibit and Poster Viewing
2:10pm - 2:15pm 5 mins
Track 1: Microbiome
Co-Chair's Remarks
  • Bertrand Routy, MD, PhD - Assistant Professor, CRCHUM, University of Montreal Research Center
  • Paul Parren, PhD - Professor, Leiden University and EVP and Head of R&D, Lava Therapeutics
2:10pm - 2:15pm 5 mins
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Chairperson's Remarks
  • Andrew Bradbury, MD, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Specifica
2:15pm - 2:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Microbiome
Taking the Microbiome and Antibody Therapies to Market: Like Peanut Butter and Jelly or More Like Oil and Water?
  • Keith Batchelder, MD - CEO and Founder, Genomic Healthcare Strategies


  • Traditional Pharma therapies and Companion Diagnostics still have fraught economic relationships. Will Microbiome and Antibodies be better/worse/different?
  • What might the FDA have to say?
  • Who will control the IP?
  • What might distribution channels look like?
  • What can be done to make the path to market better?
2:15pm - 2:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
The Impact of Next Generation Sequencing on Antibody Library Generation and Selection
  • Andrew Bradbury, MD, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Specifica

Deep integration of next generation sequencing into aspects of antibody library generation and selection provides insights into antibody library diversity and overlap between different antibody libraries, as well as the diversity of specific selected repertoires, issues that will be addressed in this talk.

2:45pm - 3:15pm 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Microbiome
Exploiting the Interactions between the Microbiota and Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Anticancer Therapies
  • Bertrand Routy, MD, PhD - Assistant Professor, CRCHUM, University of Montreal Research Center

Despite their unprecedented results in various cancers, predictors of clinical benefit and strategies to safely enhance immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICB) efficacy are urgently needed. Preclinical studies have highlighted that immune-based therapies rely upon the composition of the gut microbiota to exert their bioactivity. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that the gut microbiota composition could predict response to ICB for patients with NSCLC and melanoma. The discovery of immunogenic bacteria capable to predict and increase clinical benefit of ICB will help for the development of novel biomarker tools and a future therapeutic concept, whereby treatment of cancer can be improved by the modulation of gut microbiota.

2:45pm - 3:15pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Novel Techniques for Fab Library Generation and Antibody Hit Discovery Using Yeast Surface Display
  • Stefan Zielonka, PhD - Principal Scientist, Merck KGaA/EMD Serono

A novel one-step approach for easy and rapid construction of large yeast surface display antibody libraries will be presented. This Golden Gate Cloning-derived method allows for simultaneous introduction of heavy- and light chain diversities into one display plasmid leading to a significant streamlining of library generation. This technique seems to be valid to adequately sample antibody diversities. Additionally, a new fluorescence reporter read-out for antibody display will be presented.

3:15pm - 3:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Microbiome
Discovery and Development of Microbiome-derived Molecules as Novel Therapeutics in Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases
  • Lorenzo Tibaldi, PhD - Project Leader - Drug Discovery, Enterome Bioscience

Enterome dedicates its activities to the development of innovative therapeutic approaches (drugs and biomarkers) to support a personalized medicine for microbiome-related diseases. Based on its metagenomics screening platforms, Enterome identifies microbiome-derived molecules acting as specific and unspecific immunomodulators. In addition to several candidates currently tested at the preclinical stage, Enterome is pursuing the early clinical development of a molecule in Crohn disease and of an innovative immunotherapy in glioblastoma.

3:15pm - 3:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Interpreting Antibody Function on a Repertoire Scale
  • Brandon DeKosky, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, The University of Kansas

Recently developed technologies in paired heavy:light sequencing, native antibody library display, and computational analysis of NGS datasets have opened up new possibilities for discovering and annotating antibody performance on a repertoire scale. We will discuss the application of these technologies to understand immune function and to identify new antibody molecules with desired functional properties.

3:45pm - 4:15pm 30 mins
Track 1: Microbiome
Networking Refreshment Break
3:45pm - 4:15pm 30 mins
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Networking Refreshment Break
4:15pm - 4:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 1: Microbiome
Generation and Development of a Rationally Designed Consortia of Human Derived Commensals for Cancer Immunotherapy
  • Bruce Roberts, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Vedanta Biosciences

Vedanta has created a rationally-designed consortia of human gut derived commensals capable of inducing CD8 T cells and enhancing anti-cancer immunity in conjunction with checkpoint inhibitors. The consortia called VE800 can be produced via cGMP manufacturing and administered orally on a repeated basis and thus constitutes an attractive agent for targeted modification of the microbiome of cancer patients to enhance anti-cancer immunity.  

4:15pm - 4:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Synthetic Antibody Repertoire Design and Generation in Mammalian Cells Using CRISPR-Cas9-mediated homology-directed Mutagenesis
  • Sai Reddy, PhD - Assistant Professor, Department of Biosystems Science & Engineering, ETH Zurich

We have recently established a technique known as homology-directed mutagenesis (HDM), which is able to generate mutagenesis libraries directly in mammalian cells using CRISPR-Cas9. In HDM, we introduce genetic diversity into target proteins (e.g., antibodies) by using single stranded oligonucleotides (ssODNs), which serve as DNA donor templates following Cas9-induced DNA cleavage. HDM enables several of the most essential methods of antibody engineering to be performed in directly in mammalian cells expressing full-length IgG. This includes generation and screening of synthetic libraries for antibody discovery and affinity maturation

4:45pm - 5:15pm 30 mins
Track 1: Microbiome
Late Breaking Presentation
4:45pm - 5:15pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Library-scale Reformatting of Enriched Phage-display Pools to IgG for High-throughput Functional Screening
  • Michael Kierny, PhD - Scientist 1, Antibody Discovery & Protein Engineering, Medimmune

Phage-display selections using combinatorial libraries yield single chain fragment variable (scFv) binders that require individual conversion to IgG for functional assessment. In a method termed Screening in Product Format (SiPF), this process is streamlined by reformatting the selected library in emulsions to maintain the original VH-VL pairing and enable functional screening directly in IgG format. Examples will compare the performance and efficiency of traditional methods to SiPF.

5:15pm - 5:45pm 30 mins
Track 1: Microbiome
Late Breaking Presentation
5:15pm - 5:45pm 30 mins
Info
Track 2: Libraries, Display, Selection and Screening
Bispecific Target Discovery by High Throughput Functional Screening of Hundreds of Combinations of Different Target Pairs
  • Helene Finney, PhD - Director, Functional Screening, UCB

To exploit the true potential to access novel biology with bispecific antibodies we have developed technology to facilitate unbiased target pair identification and validation through grid screening in functional human cell assays large numbers of bispecific antibodies. Combination of our antibody discovery capabilities, a novel bispecific screening format and high throughput flow cytometry or imaging enables us to screen thousands of bispecific antibodies to hundreds of antigen combinations and identify new target pairs for a defined patient phenotype. The technology and a specific example application from patient phenotyping to new target pair discovery will be described.

5:45pm - 6:30pm 45 mins
Info
Special Session of the Antibody Society
Antibodies to Watch in 2019
  • Janice Reichert, Ph.D. - Executive Director, The Antibody Society Managing Director, Reichert Biotechnology Consulting LLC

For yet another year, a record number of recombinant antibody therapeutics may receive first marketing approvals in 2018. These products, including 4 for cancer and 9 for non-cancer indications, and those in regulatory review that might be granted approvals in 2019, will be discussed. The longer-term outlook will be provided through an overview of more than 50 antibody therapeutics in late-stage clinical studies.