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Showing of Streams
Showing of Streams
Showing of Streams
12:30pm - 1:45pm

Networking Luncheon, Exhibit and Poster Viewing

Showing of Streams
Showing of Streams
6:15pm - 7:15pm

Wednesday Reception with Exhibits and Poster Viewing

The first half of the conference may have flown by, but the fun is just getting started! Enjoy another opportunity to interact with fellow industry professionals while enjoying cocktails and appetizers!

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7:30am - 8:00am 30 mins
Scientific Breakfast Briefing #1
Scientific Breakfast Briefing: Computational Approaches for Assessing Developability and Optimization of Biotherapeutics
  • Nels Thorsteinson - Scientific Services Manager, Biologics, Chemical Computing Group
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Protein surface hydrophobic patches can lead to aggregation, poor solubility, and cross-reactivity. We present methods where homology models of sets of antibodies and related biologics with their calculated hydrophobic patches and charge properties may be used to perform solubility predictions. Liability reduction and solubility optimization while maintaining affinity are discussed.

7:30am - 8:00am 30 mins
Scientific Breakfast Briefing #2
Express Discovery: Upfront Affinity, Paired VH and VL, Organized for Intelligent Candidate Selection
  • Chun-Nan Chen, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Single Cell Technology, Inc.
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A diverse group of antibody drug candidates is critical to ensure successful coverage of the therapeutic epitope. Single Cell Technology’s discovery process provides the sequence pairs correlated with antigen affinity upfront for a library of candidates to give the best chance of success. Case studies from antibody campaigns will be presented.

8:00am - 8:10am 10 mins
Scientific Breakfast Briefing #1
Transition Time Before Morning Tracks
8:00am - 8:10am 10 mins
Scientific Breakfast Briefing #2
Transition Time Before Morning Tracks
8:10am - 8:15am 5 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Co-Chairs' Remarks
  • Co-Chair Anne Messer, Ph.D. - Principal Investigator, Neural Stem Cell Institute
  • Co-Chair Cynthia Lemere, Ph.D. - Associate Professor of Neurology, Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical
  • Co-Chair James Huston, Ph.D. - Chairman, The Antibody Society, Managing Member, Huston BioConsulting, LLC
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8:10am - 8:15am 5 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Chairman’s Remarks
  • Chairman Gregory Adams, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Eleven Biotherapeutics
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8:15am - 8:45am 30 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Delivery of Antibodies across the Blood-brain Barrier Using MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound
  • Isabelle Aubert, PhD - Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto
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Focused ultrasound (FUS), in presence of intravenously administered microbubbles, can be used to modulate the permeability of the blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barrier locally and transiently. In rodent models of neurodegenerative diseases, FUS increased the bioavailability of antibodies to the central nervous system and treatment efficacy, reducing pathology, promoting regeneration and improving cognitive functions. The delivery of therapeutics using MRI-guided FUS holds promises for the treatment of neurological disorders.

8:15am - 8:45am 30 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Redox Selenium ADCs Improve Cancer Cell Monoclonal Antibody Cytotoxicity
  • Julian Spallholz, Ph.D. - Professor, Nutritional Sciences, Texas Tech University
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Currently there are ~ 30 FDA approved monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of various cancers. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of some mAbs; radioisotopes, drugs and other toxins have been attached to the to the mAbs, collectively called Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs). Most ADCs upon cell endocytosis require release of the drug from the mAb for the drug to be effective. With an understanding of endogenous redox oxidative stress inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, this laboratory has covalently attached redox selenium (Se) to targeting cancer mAbs. Such Se-labeled mAbs are shown to generate superoxide (O2.-) in vitro using a chemiluminescent assay and intracellularly using a dihydroethidium fluorescence assay. Toxicity of these Se-ADCs is time and dose dependent against cancer cells inducing oxidative stress within cells and apoptosis. Whereas some native mAbs may be relatively ineffective against cancer cell lines in vitro, Se-ADCs are often very cytotoxic against these same cancer cell lines. Triple Negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines are quite susceptible to Se-ADCs causing apoptosis. We believe this ADC redox Se approach to cancer therapy may be more beneficial over attempts to deliver toxic drugs as dead cancer cells from oxidative stress will not permit latter relapse from mAb or drug resistance.

8:45am - 9:15am 30 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Structural Basis for The Unique Selectivity of Aducanumab for Amyloid-b Aggregates
  • Paul Weinreb, Ph.D. - Director, Biologics Drug Discovery, Biogen
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Aducanumab, a human-derived antibody targeting amyloid-β (Aβ), is in phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease; it differs from other Aβ antibodies due to its high selectivity for both soluble oligomeric and insoluble fibrillar Aβ aggregates. We have determined the crystal structure of a Fab fragment of aducanumab in complex with an Ab peptide fragment. The molecular details that comprise the antibody-peptide interface provide insights into the structural basis for its unique binding profile.

8:45am - 9:15am 30 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Antibody-drug conjugates for treating steroid-resistant malignancies and autoimmune diseases
  • Masahiro Yasunaga, M.D., Ph.D. - Unit Leader, Division of Developmental Therapeutics, National Cancer Center
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The occurrence of autoimmune reactions caused by immune checkpoint blockade in the treatment of cancer indicates the importance of the cross-disciplinary study of malignancy and autoimmune disease, which are two sides of the same coin. Although steroids have been commonly used for the treatment of malignancies and immune diseases, steroid resistance remains an unsolved problem, and therapeutic alternatives are clearly required. IL-7/IL-7R signaling, which physiologically regulates lymphocyte growth and survival, including antigen-responsive T lymphocyte selection, has been implicated in the development of malignancies and autoimmune diseases. However, the biological significance of IL-7/IL-7R signaling in steroid treatment is poorly understood. Here, we confirm the relationship between IL-7R signaling and steroid resistance in lymphoid malignancy and demonstrated the presence of steroid-resistant IL-7R-positive lymphocytes in mouse bone marrow and spleen following treatment with steroids. We further show that an anti-IL-7R antibody conjugated with SN-38 (A7R-ADC-SN-38) has strong anti-tumor effects against both parent and steroid-resistant cells. Although A7R-ADC-SN-38 efficiently eliminated IL-7R-positive cells, IL-7R-negative mature lymphocytes were preserved. Furthermore, an A7R-ADC conjugated to MMAE suppressed inflammation to a greater extent in a mouse autoimmune arthritis model than when it was conjugated to SN-38. This suggests that the cytotoxicity and immunosuppression of A7R-ADC could be modulated to address the individual types or activities of the malignancies or autoimmune diseases with an appropriate payload. Strong and specific elimination of enhanced IL-7R-positive cells, a common pathogenesis of both lymphoid malignancy and autoimmune disease, might prevent the development of malignancy or autoimmune disease in high-risk patient s. Thus, A7R-ADC may be a promising strategy for treating malignancies and immune diseases, and may serve as a novel alternative to steroid therapy.

9:15am - 9:45am 30 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Altering APP Processing with a Proteolytic Diabody
  • Michael Sierks, Ph.D. - Professor, Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Arizona State University
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We engineered a bispecific tandem antibody fragment that has applications for treating AD and related neurodegenerative diseases by tailoring APP processing to promote neuroprotective processing while simultaneously inhibiting toxic amyloidogenic processing.

9:15am - 9:45am 30 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Targeting Tumors and Their Vasculature with Antibody-drug Conjugates
  • Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D. - Professor and Director, Center for Antibody Therapeutics (CAT), University of Pittsburgh Medical School
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Targeting the tumor vasculature with antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) is a promising anti-cancer strategy. We demonstrated an ADC-MMAE targeting CD276 destroyed CD276-positive cancer cells, but was ineffective against tumor vasculature. In contrast, pyrrolobenzodiazepine-conjugated CD276-ADC killed both cancer cells and tumor vasculature, eradicating large established tumors and metastases, and improving long-term overall survival. CD276 targeted dual-compartment ablation could aid in development of highly selective broad-acting anti-cancer therapies (Seaman S et al. Cancer Cell. 2017 Apr 10;31(4):501-515). Data for ADCs targeting other cancer-related molecules will be also discussed.

9:45am - 10:30am 45 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Networking Refreshment Break, Exhibit and Poster Viewing
9:45am - 10:30am 45 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Networking Refreshment Break, Exhibit and Poster Viewing
10:30am - 11:00am 30 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Towards Development of Antibody Therapy for C9orf72 ALS/FTD
  • Laura Ranum, Ph.D. - Director, Center for NeuroGenetics, Kitzman Family Professor of Molecular Genetics, University of Florida
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We recently developed a BAC transgenic model of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD that develops key phenotypic and molecular features of the disease including decreased survival, paralysis, motor-neuron loss, anxiety-like behavior and cortical/hippocampal neurodegeneration. We will discuss preclinical immunotherapeutic approaches for this disease, including peripheral delivery of human antibodies that target the mutant RAN proteins in these mice.

10:30am - 11:00am 30 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Novel Calicheamicin Antibody-Drug Conjugates
  • Julia Gavrilyuk, Ph.D. - Principal Scientist, Discovery Chemistry, Abbvie Stemcentrx
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Development and evaluation of the novel and stable calicheamicin antibody-drug conjugates will be presented. Emphasis will be made on the complexity of the correlation between in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy. Impact of the linker structure and payload release mechanisms on the TI and overall toxicologic profile of ADCs will be discussed.

11:00am - 11:30am 30 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Treatment of Neuronal Pathology with Monoclonal Antibodies
  • Cristina D'Abramo, Ph.D. - Assistant Investigator, The Litwin-Zucker Research Center for the Study of Alzheimer's Disease, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore - LIJ
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The notion that it is possible to treat pathology developing with neurons of the central nervous system by systemic administration of antibodies is quite new. One example of this approach is the attempt to prevent or reverse the development of neurofibrillary tangles in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, and some successes have been reported. There are several ways in which this might work, although these are still all debatable.

11:00am - 11:30am 30 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Small is Beautiful – Humabody® Drug Conjugates, HDCs a Real Alternative to ADCs
  • Brian McGuinness, Ph.D., MBA - Head of New Product & Business Opportunities, Crescendo Biologics
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Crescendo is developing a pipeline of novel multifunctional Humabody® therapeutics demonstrating excitingly differentiated efficacy compared with clinical mAbs. Optimally configured Humabody Drug Conjugates (HDCs) engage therapeutically valuable targets in a way that is different from whole antibodies, unlocking superior therapeutic index. Highly potent HDCs will play an important role in the next generation of targeted oncology therapeutics as a critical component of increasingly effective combination regimes.

11:30am - 12:00pm 30 mins
Track 1: Engineering and Application of Therapeutic Antibodies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Combinatorial Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Synucleinopathies of the Aging Population
  • Eliezer Masliah, M.D. - Director, Division of Neurosciences, National Institutes of Aging, NIH
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Synucleinopathies of the aging population includes PD, DLB and AD and affects over 5 million in the US, the main pathological feature is the abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein that also triggers inflammation, myelin loss and neurodegeneration. Active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches targeting alpha-synuclein have been developed and are moving into clinical trials. Although selective antibodies against alpha-synucleinare effective, additional treatments are needed that reduce inflammation and potentiate the effects of antibodies. Combinatorial approaches harnessing T Reg cells or targeting inflammatory pathways might be helpful toward this goal. Results supporting the synergistic effects of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory therapies with vaccination against alpha-synuclein shows promise in the treatment of synucleinopathies.

11:30am - 12:00pm 30 mins
Track 2: Antibody-Drug Conjugates & Fusion Proteins
Exploring the Ability of ADCs and Fusion Proteins to Drive Host Immune Responses That Can Set the Stage for Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy
  • Gregory Adams, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer, Eleven Biotherapeutics
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12:00pm - 12:30pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 1
Advancing the Discovery and Development of Immunotherapeutics with Large Scale, Multiplexed Experiments on Suspension Cells and Proteins
  • Thomas Duensing, Ph.D. - Chief Technology Officer, IntelliCyt Corporation
  • Joseph Rucker, Ph.D. - Vice President Research and Development, Integral Molecular
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Learn how the iQue® Screener is platform is being employed to discover new therapeutic antibodies, and to understand functional efficacy of immunooncology therapies, and to screen for highly productive clones during the cell line generation process. Learn how Integral Molecular utilized the IntelliCyt platform to characterizing antibodies against cell surface targets with their proprietary Shotgun Mutagenesis Epitope Mapping and the Membrane Proteome Array technologies.

12:00pm - 12:30pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 2
Keys to Accelerating the Development of Biotherapeutics Using Advanced Cell Engineering
  • Joseph Abad - Field Applications Scientist, MaxCyte
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High-performance cell engineering can significantly reduce risk and accelerate therapeutic development timelines by expanding the footprint of transient transfection during candidate selection and optimization, as well as streamlining migration to stable cell line generation for toxicology studies and clinical manufacturing.

• Large-scale transient expression of quality antibodies, bispecifics and Fc fragments

• Rapid generation of high-yield stable pools and clones

• Genome modification for improved yield and fine tuning of post-translational modifications


12:00pm - 12:30pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 3
Optimization of Antibody Drug Conjugate in vivo Stability, Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy through Reagent Drug Design
  • George Badescu, PhD - Vice President Scientific Affairs, Business Development, Abzena
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By varying size, position and presence of a solubilising polymer and drug loading we have produced ADCs with different drug reagent architectures. Data highlighting reagent design, ADC production and systematic evaluation in vitro and in vivo using rodent pharmacokinetic and efficacy models will be presented to demonstrate critical impact of drug linker design on the in vivo properties of ADCs.

12:30pm - 1:45pm 75 mins
Networking Luncheon, Exhibit and Poster Viewing
1:45pm - 2:15pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 1
Scalable Sequence Data Analysis for Accelerated Precision Antibody Discovery
  • Jannick Bendtsen, PhD - Vice President of Technology Services, Geneious Biologics
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Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies will, more than ever before, provide the ability to comprehensively characterize and evaluate the diversity and quality of antibody libraries, accelerating identification of potential drug candidates. However, NGS also necessitates software that can intelligently manage and process large volumes of sequence data together with masses of associated functional assay data.

1:45pm - 2:15pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 2
Scaleable, High-throughput, Diverse, and Fully-human Antibodies in a Fraction of the Time
  • Jennifer Bath, PhD - Senior Director, Antibody Discovery, Aldevron
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Continuing our commitment to providing excellent, client focused antibody development, Aldevron has built on it's already well-known genetic immunization (Genovac) strategy and biotherapeutics pipeline with advanced technology to provide superior, expanded diversity and high-throughput human antibody development in a fraction of the time, as compared to standard hybridoma technologies.


1:45pm - 2:15pm 30 mins
Scientific Briefing 3
Build Better Biologics with Machine Learning and Synbio
  • Claes Gustafsson, Ph.D. - Chief Commercial Officer and Co-Founder, ATUM (formerly DNA2.0)
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ATUM (formerly DNA2.0) has pioneered the use of machine learning and synbio for wide ranging biotechnology applications. This presentation will showcase how ATUM combines recent developments in genome engineering, automation, big data and product analytics to increase efficiency of engineering and developability of biologics and cell lines generated using the LeapIn® transposase combined with optimized vector constructs.

2:25pm - 2:30pm 5 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Co-Chairs' Remarks
  • Co-Chair Dennis Burton, PhD - Professor and Chairman, Department of Immunology & Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Co-Chair Paul Parren, Ph.D. - Professor, Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Center
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2:25pm - 2:30pm 5 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Chairman’s Remarks
  • Chairman Karl Dane Wittrup, Ph.D. - C.P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Eng. and Biol. En., Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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2:30pm - 3:00pm 30 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Integrative Mass Spectrometric Structural Analysis of Glycoprotein Therapeutics and Its Usage to Evaluate and Score Biosimilarity
  • Albert Heck, Ph.D. - Professor, Science Faculty, Utrecht University
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Biopharmaceutical products exhibit extensive structural micro-heterogeneity due to co-occurring post-translational modifications. These modifications affect their functionality and thus need to be characterized in detail. Here, we present an integrative approach, combining high-resolution native mass spectrometry and middle-down proteomics, to analyze this micro-heterogeneity. Taking mAbs and erythropoietin as model systems, we demonstrate an all-inclusive profiling of glycoproteins. We demonstrate the usage of a biosimilarity score to quantitatively assess structural similarities.

2:30pm - 3:00pm 30 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Tumor Targeting Antibodies: Distinct Innate and Adaptive Immune Sensing
  • Yang-Xin Fu, M.D., Ph.D. - Professor of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center
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Tumor cells express a panel of surface molecules to promote their growth and evade immune responses, such as oncogenic receptors. Tumor targeting antibodies have been designed to kill tumor cells.  Several mechanisms have been proposed, including stress-induced apoptosis, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, complement dependent cytotoxicity, and increased phagocytosis.  We have now observed that anti-tumor antibodies-mediated tumor regression depends on distinct innate sensing pathway.     Therefore, our studies have now revealed a distinct mechanism for antibody-mediated tumor regression that include different innate sensing and adaptive pathways and open new avenue for combinational therapies with other conventional drugs and immunotherapy.

3:00pm - 3:30pm 30 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Post-translational Modification of Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Leendert Trouw, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor, Department of Immunohematology and Bloodtransfusion, Leiden University Medical Center
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Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the joints. Sera of around 60% of the RA patients contain autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antibodies that target proteins that have been post-translationally modified by citrullination and carbamylation. Interestingly, also antibodies can be post-translationally modified. The presentation will focus on carbamylation and glycosylation of antibodies in RA.

3:00pm - 3:30pm 30 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Innate and Adaptive Integrin-targeted Combination Immunotherapy
  • Jennifer Cochran, Ph.D. - Co-Founder and Director, Nodus Therapeutics and Associate Professor, Bioengineering & Chemical Engineering, Stanford University
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3:30pm - 4:00pm 30 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Regulation of Autoantibody Activity by the IL-23–TH17 Axis and Its Impact on Autoimmune Disease
  • Gerhard Krönke, M.D. - Professor of Translational Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
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Our recent data show that the IL-23–TH17 axis controls the intrinsic inflammatory activity of autoantibodies and thereby triggers the clinical onset of autoimmune arthritis in mice and humans suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. TH17 cells regulate expression of sialyltransferases in newly differentiating antibody-producing cells and determine the glycosylation profile and activity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) that is produced by the consecutively emerging plasma cells.

3:30pm - 4:00pm 30 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Cetuximab and Therapeutic T-cell Responses
  • Fernando Concha-Benavente, M.D., Ph.D. - Research Associate, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center
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4:00pm - 4:45pm 45 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Networking Refreshment Break, Exhibit and Poster Viewing
4:00pm - 4:45pm 45 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Networking Refreshment Break, Exhibit and Poster Viewing
4:45pm - 5:15pm 30 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Diversification of Antibody Effector Function
  • Taia Wang, M.D., Ph.D. - Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine
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Antibodies produced in response to a foreign antigen are characterized by polyclonality, not only in the diverse epitopes to which their variable domains bind but also in the various effector molecules to which their constant regions (Fc domains) engage. Thus, while Fab-antigen interactions are crucial to the specificity of the antibody response, there is a crucial role for the Fc domain in mediating the diverse effector properties triggered by antigen recognition, even for processes traditionally attributed solely to recognition by the Fab, such as neutralization of toxins and viruses.  Specific interactions of the IgG Fc domain with distinct receptors expressed by diverse immune cell types result in the pleiotropic effector functions for IgG, including the clearance of pathogens and toxins, lysis and removal of infected or malignant cells, modulation of the innate and adaptive branches of immunity to shape an immune response, and initiation of anti-inflammatory pathways that actively suppress immunity. The Fc domain mediates these diverse effector activities by engaging two distinct classes of Fc receptors (type I and type II) on the basis of the distinct conformational states that the Fc domain may adopt. These conformational states are regulated by the differences among antibody subclasses in their amino acid sequence and by the complex, biantennary Fc-associated N-linked glycan. I will discuss the diverse downstream proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory consequences of the engagement of type I and type II Fc receptors in the context of infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders.

4:45pm - 5:15pm 30 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Targeting Cell Surface Chaperone in Cancer Therapy
  • Amy Lee, Ph.D. - Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern California
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Molecular chaperones are emerging as novel targets for immunotherapy. Under pathological conditions, Glucose Regulated Protein GRP78 (HSPA5/BiP) can relocalize to the cell surface where it exerts control over survival and invasiveness. The preferential expression of GRP78 on the surface of tumor cells but not normal organs in vivo enables antibody-based theranostics. This approach may be particularly relevant in targeting aggressive and resistant tumors which exhibit elevated levels of cell surface GRP78.

5:15pm - 5:45pm 30 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Biochemical Stability of the Clinical-stage Antibody Landscape
  • Yingda Xu, Ph.D. - Associate Director, Protein Analytics, Adimab
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Poor biophysical properties of antibodies can often lead to stability related issues during their development. Similarly, antibodies with chemically labile sites can present development challenges from degradation, loss of function to immunogenicity. Here we present data from characterization of ~140 clinical stage antibodies, by forced chemical degradation, for detection of chemically unstable sites, including Met oxidation, Asp isomerization and Asn deamidation.

5:15pm - 5:45pm 30 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Investigating the Basis for Efficacy and Resistance to Tumor Immunotherapy
  • Edgar Engleman, M.D. - Professor of Pathology and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine
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The reasons why some tumors respond to immunotherapy while others resist are incompletely understood. Applying mass cytometry and novel informatics tools to investigate these questions in mice, we discovered that effective immunotherapy requires a coordinated system-wide immune response involving multiple immune cell types. The results also reveal a critical role for CD4 T effector-memory cells and demonstrate how one mechanism of resistance can develop. The methods we developed for these studies can be used to analyze the effects of any disease or intervention on the immune system.

5:45pm - 6:15pm 30 mins
Track 1: Role of Post-Translational Modification in Antibody Function
Sulfation of Broadly Neutralizing HIV Antibodies
  • Raiees Andrabi, PhD - Research Associate, Burton Lab, The Scripps Research Institute
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Tyrosine sulfation is a critical posttranslational modification in two of the human mAb classes targeting HIV Env co-receptor binding site and the V2 apex site. The sulfation pattern in co-receptor binding site mAbs allows them to interact with gp120 that mimic CCR5 chemokine receptor binding. The V2 apex bnAbs possess sulfated tyrosines in their CDRH3 loops that enable them to interact with Env V2 apex bnAb epitope in germline Ab configuration. The examples illustrate how tyrosine sulfation of human Abs contributes to antigen recognition on the surface of pathogens.

5:45pm - 6:15pm 30 mins
Track 2: Anti-Tumor Antigen Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy
Panel Discussion
6:15pm - 7:15pm 60 mins
Wednesday Reception with Exhibits and Poster Viewing
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The first half of the conference may have flown by, but the fun is just getting started! Enjoy another opportunity to interact with fellow industry professionals while enjoying cocktails and appetizers!